Wilderness Survival Cell Phone

When the apocalypse hit, there was no cell service. So what do you do? Well, one man did something crazy and put all his eggs in one basket-his phone. If a signal is not found within 12 hours of your last call, they’re gone. What’s up with this guy?

The “wilderness survival cell phone” is a device that is used by people who are going on adventures. It has all the tools that you need in order to survive. Read more in detail here: survival phone.

Note from the editor: This is a guest post by Creek Stewart.

We discussed the tampon’s various survival applications last week. A guy is unlikely to have one on him in an emergency unless he deliberately brought one in his backpack or vehicle. So today we’ll look at the survival applications of a commonplace object that you’re far more likely to have with you in an emergency: your phone.

Have you ever left your house without your phone? For the most part, the answer is no these days. I believe I would feel better at ease leaving the house without my trousers on. When I don’t have my phone, I feel more exposed. We carry a mobile phone with us at all times since it has become our doorway to the world. They are available in a range of sizes and forms.

Our mobile phones have become a regular item of Every Day Carry whether we’re on a boat, in an aircraft, traveling across Africa, on a road trip, or trekking through the Rockies (EDC). If we are ever confronted with a horrific survival scenario, I believe it is fair to assume that we will have our mobile phones with us. It’s also not difficult to believe it’s not functioning. Whatever the cause, a damaged or cracked mobile phone is still an incredible collection of components and parts that may be utilized to satisfy a surprising number of basic survival requirements with a little insight and imagination. How did I get to this conclusion? To discover out, I cracked into a few cellphones.

Vintage parts of cell phones illustration.

Mirror with a Survival Signal

Behind the displays of each of the phones I opened, there were metallic, mirror-like layers of substance. These are ideal for use as a survival signal mirror. Land, air, and marine rescue workers can see a mirror’s image for miles. Many survivors’ lives have been saved as a result of this. Even a brilliant moon’s reflection may be used to create a flash at night. I “glued” the reflecting bits to a lump of bark using pine sap to make a more usable signal mirror.

Vintage a painting at the tree illustration.

Vintage cell phones screens illustration.

It takes a little care to aim an improvised signal mirror. Simply make a peace sign with your hands and position your objective (the rescue team) between your fingers. Then, using your fingertips, flash the sun’s reflection. The reflection on your fingertips assures that you are flashing your target as well.

Vintage a man showing his two fingers.

Vintage man capturing a shoot of two fingers with mobile camera.

Navigation

A magnet is found in most (if not all) speakers. The speaker section of all of the phones I opened had a magnet attached to it. All of the phones had a lot of little bits of wire that I could magnetize; it had to be a ferrous metal wire because copper wouldn’t work. You can create a pretty precise makeshift compass with just two things.

Vintage three magnet placed on earth.

Sweep the magnet over the metal wire 10 times in the SAME direction. Make a mental note of which way the magnet is sweeping. This is the NORTH-pointing end of the wire. You may then FLOAT this metal wire on a little leaf or shaving of wood in a small pool of water. To avoid affecting the findings, it must be a fully undisturbed pool of water with no current. With the end you described above pointed north, the wire will align itself with the NORTH-SOUTH line (in the Northern Hemisphere). East is to the north’s right, while west is to the north’s left. You now have a sense of direction.

 

Vintage navigation illustration.

Cutting Tools & Spear Points

A circuit board was also included in each mobile phone. I made two really handy objects for a survivor using the circuit board from a SmartPhone. I discovered that abrading the edge of the circuit board on a smooth rock resulted in a rather good cutting edge. I made a helpful cutting tool out of half of the circuit board, which I used to collect and cut some natural bark cordage, as well as scrape a mound of extremely thin fire tinder shavings off a dried Mullein stalk. Both of these goods will come in handy for a survivor. This primitive cutting tool may also be utilized for a number of other survival tasks.

Vintage abrading the edge of the circuit board against a smooth rock.

Vintage lashing onto the end of a willow shaft using the natural cordage.

The other half of the circuit board was then molded into a “arrowhead” spear tip, which I tied to the end of a willow shaft using the natural cordage I had collected. To sharpen this point, I rubbed the edges on the stone. I’ve created a lot of improvised spears and gigs in my time, and I’m certain that this point can do some significant harm in self-defense or food acquisition.

Vintage abrading the edges of this point against the stone to sharpen.

Vintage abrading the edges of this point against the stone to sharpen.

Vintage edges of this point close up photo illustration

Vintage abrading the edges illustration.

I also made a back-up job by folding and pressing a tiny, thin piece of metal into another arrowhead-shaped point (with two rocks). This is razor-sharp and looks a lot like an improvised broadhead.

Vintage folding and pounding a small, thin piece of metal into another arrowhead-shaped point.

Then he lit a fire.

The battery is perhaps the most important part of a damaged mobile phone to a survivor. A spark or a hot enough wire may be generated by short-circuiting almost any battery to ignite combustible tinder. Fire may be used to signal for aid, boil water, control core body temperature, produce tools, ward off predators, and prepare food in a survival scenario.

Vintage burning fire illustration.

The steel wool trick has been around for a long time. When rubbed over the positive and negative terminals of a mobile phone battery, steel wool ignites immediately. When was the last time you saw a wild steel wool tree, though? In a survival scenario, I really doubt you’ll have any steel wool on hand.

However, to connect (and short circuit) the mobile phone battery, I utilized tiny wire located inside a cell phone. When I touched the + and – terminals at the same time, it almost instantaneously became red hot. To achieve this, I had to remove the battery’s exterior covering. Make sure you have enough of fire tinder on hand since it won’t last long and is almost probably a one-time opportunity. This red hot wire may be used to light finding tinder like the seed pod below or a spare SURVIVAL TAMPON.

Vintage negative and positive terminal attached of battery.

Vintage using thin wire illustration.

Vintage fire tinder ready illustration.

I also attempted to amplify the sun’s beams using a phone’s camera lens, but was unsuccessful in getting anything to burn or ignite. I was ecstatic about this prospect, but I couldn’t make it work:

 

Vintage lens and camera illustration.

Lures for fishing

When I glanced at the pile of phone components in front of me, I saw that some of them looked suspiciously like fishing lures, so I got to work and quickly made these four fishing lures.

Vintage pile of cell phone parts illustration.

The GORGE lure is the most basic of the bunch. Instead of catching a fish, this traditional survival fishing hook “gorges” itself in the fish’s throat. It has to be baited in the same direction as the fish line, as seen below. The gorge pivots on the line and “gorges” in the throat after the fish consumes the bait and the line is pushed tight. In one phone, I counted up to 20 gorge lures. You could lay up many fishing lines to work for you if you had enough cordage.

Vintage classic survival fishing hook illustration.

Snare for Small Game Survival

Do you listen to your phone using wired headphones?

Vintage headphones placed on earth.

If that’s the case, this application might be useful. The cable from a pair of headphones may be used to make a tiny game survival snare. This wire may also be used for a number of other cordage-related applications. Snares enable you to concentrate on other survival concerns while they search for you. Read this survival snare article to learn how to create this snare.

Vintage using the wire from a pair of headphones.

Allow the headphones to discreetly look for you instead of playing your music.

Conclusion

It goes without saying that dismantling your phone should only be done as a last resort in a survival situation. Even if there seems to be no coverage, your phone may be able to receive a ping from neighboring mobile phone towers, which first responders may use to determine your position. However, if it’s already been discovered, one of these methods may be able to save your life. What additional survival options do you have for a broken mobile phone?

It goes without saying that dismantling your phone should only be done as a last resort in a survival situation. Even if there seems to be no coverage, your phone may be able to receive a ping from neighboring mobile phone towers, which first responders may use to determine your position. However, if it’s already been discovered, one of these methods may be able to save your life. What additional survival options do you have for a broken mobile phone?

Creek Stewart teaches at Willow Haven Outdoor School for Survival, Preparedness, and Bushcraft as a Senior Instructor. Creek’s life’s work is to educate, share, and preserve outdoor survival and living skills. Creek’s book Build the Perfect Bug Out Bag: Your 72-Hour Disaster Survival Kit is also available. Visit Willowhaven Outdoor for additional information.

 

 

The “military grade cell phone” is a device that is used to survive in the wilderness. It includes a compass, GPS tracking, and many other features.

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