Father’s Day is a day to show appreciation for and celebrate the presence of the man who brought you into this world. Fatherhood has changed dramatically over time, with some fathers playing vital roles in their children’s lives while others have been replaced by technology or other work opportunities.

Father’s Day is a day to celebrate the bond between fathers and their children. It is celebrated in many different ways around the world. From the Christian tradition, to Native American traditions, to Greek Orthodox traditions, Father’s Day has been celebrated in many different cultures. Read more in detail here: father’s day story ideas.

Father’s Day is approaching, therefore the Art of Manliness is providing a series of father-themed blogs in his honor. Today, we’ll take a look at the origins of Father’s Day. Unfortunately, in order to earn a fast profit, merchants and marketers have twisted the original spirit of Father’s Day. A celebration that was designed to commemorate dad and highlight his unique attributes is being utilized to promote chili pepper ties and shop vacs. We may perhaps better recognize and celebrate the dads who raised us into men by learning why Father’s Day was started.

In the United States, Father’s Day has a long and illustrious history.

There are two versions of when Father’s Day was originally observed. According to some reports, the first Father’s Day was observed on June 19, 1910, in Washington state. In 1909, while listening to a Mother’s Day lecture at church, Sonora Smart Dodd came up with the notion of honoring and praising her father. She thought that moms were receiving all of the focus while dads were equally entitled of a day of recognition (she would probably be disappointed if Mother’s Day continues to get the most of the attention).

Sonora’s father was a formidable figure. William Smart, a Civil War soldier, became a widower when his wife died during the delivery of their sixth child. He then raised the six children on their modest farm in Washington by himself. To demonstrate her gratitude for all of William’s hard work and affection for her and her siblings, Sonora proposed that a day be set aside to honor him and other fathers like him. She proposed that Father’s Day be celebrated on June 5th, the date of her father’s death, but owing to poor preparation, the commemoration in Spokane, Washington was postponed to the third Sunday in June.

The second narrative of the first Father’s Day in America took place on July 5, 1908 in Fairmont, West Virginia, all the way across the nation. After a fatal mine explosion killed 361 men, Grace Golden Clayton recommended to the pastor of the local Methodist church that they arrange ceremonies to honor dads.

While Father’s Day was observed in a number of places throughout the country, unofficial support for making the day a national holiday grew quickly. One of its most ardent supporters was William Jennings Bryant. President Calvin “Silent Cal” Coolidge proposed making Father’s Day a national holiday in 1924. However, no formal action was taken.

By executive order, Lyndon B. Johnson selected the third Sunday in June as the official day to commemorate Father’s Day in 1966. However, Father’s Day was not formally recognized as a national holiday until 1972, under the Nixon administration.

Father’s Day Celebrations Around the World

Father’s Day has also caught on in other nations. While many people celebrated it on the third Sunday in June, some chose alternate dates to remember their father. So, just in case you’re wondering when to pay your respects to dear old dad, here’s a list of Father’s Day dates throughout the globe.

 

  • 14 March – Iran
  • Bolivia, Honduras, Italy, Lichtenstein, Portugal, and Spain – March 19
  • South Korea, 8 May
  • Lithuania – First Sunday in June
  • Austria, Ecuador, and Belgium – second Sunday in June
  • Antigua and Barbuda, Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, France, Greece, Guyana, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Netherlands, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Saint Vincent, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Zimbabwe
  • El Salvador, Guatemala, 17 June
  • Nicaragua, Poland, and Uganda on June 23.
  • Uruguay – Second Sunday in July
  • Dominican Republic, last Sunday in July
  • Brazil’s second Sunday in August
  • Taiwan, China, August 8th
  • Argentina, 24 August
  • Australia and New Zealand on the first Sunday of September
  • Nepal’s September New Moon
  • Luxembourg – 1st Sunday in October
  • Estonia, Finland, Norway, and Sweden – second Sunday in November
  • Thailand, 5 December

Don’t simply get your Dad a mediocre “World’s Best Dad” mug for Father’s Day. Write him a note in which you show your admiration for and affection for him. There’s nothing gooey here. Simply tell him how happy you are to be his son.

 

 

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Father’s Day is a holiday that is celebrated in many different countries. It has been around since the 1800s, but it was not until the 1940s that Father’s Day became an official holiday in America. Reference: father’s day usa.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why is fathers Day different around the world?

A: Most countries in the world have Fathers Day on the third Sunday of June.

Where was the first fathers Day celebrated?

A: The first fathers day was celebrated on June 19, 1910 by President Taft as a way to honor American fathers.

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